fbpx

The Benefits Of Drinking A Gallon Of Water A Day + 5 Tips To Drink More!

Our diet and nutrition resources are rigorously vetted by our expert team and adhere to our Diet and Nutrition Guidelines.

It often seems that we are surrounded by messages about the importance of drinking enough water. Water is essential for proper health and function, and chronic dehydration can lead to a host of problems.

But, exactly how much water should you drink in a day? Is drinking a gallon of water a day good for you? Is drinking a gallon of water a day too much? What are the benefits of drinking a gallon of water a day?

In this article, we will discuss whether drinking a gallon of water a day is too much or is good for your body, the benefits of drinking a gallon of water a day (or enough water for your needs), and actionable tips for how to drink more water.

We will cover the following: 

  • Is Drinking a Gallon of Water a Day Good for You?
  • Benefits of Drinking a Gallon of Water A Day
  • Is It Bad to Drink a Gallon of Water a Day?
  • Tips to Drink More Water

Let’s dive in! 

A person holding out a glass of water.

Is Drinking a Gallon of Water a Day Good for You?

Before we delve more deeply into whether drinking a gallon of water a day is too much or is good for you, let’s look at what it means to drink a gallon of water a day.

A gallon of water is 128 fluid ounces or approximately 3.785 liters. This is quite a bit of water. 

In fact, drinking a gallon of water a day is twice as much as the standard daily water drinking recommendation of eight 8-ounce (237 mL) glasses of water per day.

Note that drinking 8 x 8-ounce glasses of water per day works out to 64 ounces vs. 128 ounces for drinking a gallon of water per day.

So, is a gallon of water a day too much? Can you drink too much water?

As with many things related to health, your daily hydration needs are highly individualized. 

There are numerous factors that affect how much water you should drink per day, including the following:

Pouring water into a glass from a plastic bottle.

#1: Your Body Size

The hydration needs for larger individuals are generally greater than for people with a smaller body size.

When you have a larger body, you have more cells, a greater blood volume, larger lungs that expire more water vapor over the course of the day, etc.

Due to the fact that the average male body size is larger than the average female body size, the daily water recommendations for men are higher than for women (note that there are plenty of exceptions here).

#2: Your Activity Level

Your activity level also plays a significant role in how much water you should drink in a day.

When we exercise, the body loses fluid through both sweat and water vapor from increased respiration (exhaling faster and harder).

You need to replace the fluids lost in sweat by drinking more water on days that you are active.

A person working out drinking from a bottle of water.

#3: Your Sweat Rate

We all have a unique sweat rate that is determined by numerous factors such as genetics, training status, body size, etc. 

Those who sweat more will need to drink more water to maintain proper hydration status.

#4: The Climate

Where you live also affects how much water you need to drink per day.

Particularly if you live in a hot and dry climate, you will lose more water through sweat even when you are not exercising.

#5: Your Diet

An overlooked factor that influences how much water you need to drink every day is your overall diet.

Daily hydration needs are based on total fluid intake, which includes drinking fluids as well as consuming fluids through foods. 

If your diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, soups, and other watery foods, you will not need to drink as much water because some of your fluid needs will already be satisfied by what you are eating.

A plant-based diet rich in fruits and vegetables may provide upwards of 20% of your daily fluid intake through foods.

A person holding a bottle of water with lemon slices.

#6: Pregnancy Status

Pregnancy and breastfeeding can both increase your daily hydration needs.

The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) suggests that pregnancy increases hydration needs by 10 ounces (300 ml) per day during pregnancy, and breastfeeding increases daily fluid consumption needs by 24 ounces (700 mL).

Benefits of Drinking a Gallon of Water A Day

Many people are interested in the drinking a gallon of water a day challenge.

After all, a gallon of water a day is a nice round measurement for those who live in the United States and use the gallon for liquid volume. Plus, it’s an impressive amount of water, and there are so many benefits to drinking enough water.

The following list is posed as a “benefits of drinking a gallon of water a day“ list, but in actuality, the list is designed to highlight the benefits of drinking enough water every day, whether that is a gallon for your body size and needs or a different amount.

A person drinking a glass of water.

As just enumerated in the many factors that can affect how much water you should drink per day, drinking a gallon of water a day may be just right for you, or it might be too much or too little.

Therefore, you can substitute the “benefits of drinking a gallon of water a day“ with “the benefits of drinking enough water every day for my needs” title to make this drinking water benefits list applicable to your own personal life.

Drinking a Gallon of Water a Day Supports Optimal Functioning

Studies have found that the body is composed of about 70% water, and nearly every cell in the body requires water to retain its shape and function. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that proper hydration is critical for optimal health.

A person at a table drinking a glass of water.

Some of the vital roles of water in the body include:

Therefore, drinking enough water is crucial for maintaining proper hydration levels and supporting the health of cells and tissues.

Drinking Enough Water Prevents Dehydration

We often hear about the adverse effects of not drinking enough water. 

Dehydration is associated with symptoms such as headaches, dizziness, fatigue, food cravings, slower metabolic rate, potential weight gain, poor cognitive functioning, dizziness or low blood pressure, joint pain, and reduced athletic performance, among other consequences.

A glass of water being poured.

Is It Bad to Drink a Gallon of Water a Day?

While it’s clear that drinking enough water is crucial for optimal health, is a gallon of water a day too much?

According to the U.S. National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine’s Dietary Reference Intakes for Electrolytes and Water, the total daily fluid intake for adults living in temperature climates is about 15.5 cups (3.7 liters) for men and about 11.5 cups (2.7 liters) for women. 

These water recommendations for men are not much less than a gallon, but a gallon of water for most women is likely too much.

Note that these recommendations include fluids in foods, which often constitute 20% of daily fluid intake.

Most health experts suggest that there are no additional benefits gained by drinking more than the recommended amounts (in this particular study, the daily hydration suggestions were 3000mL for males and 2,200mL for females).

It is also possible to drink too much water.

When you drink too much plain water without replenishing electrolytes, you can deplete your sodium levels to dangerously low levels in a condition known as hyponatremia or other dangerous electrolyte imbalances.

A person drinking a glass of water.

Tips to Drink More Water

Do you struggle to drink enough water? Here are a few tips to help you drink more water throughout the day:

  • Set a timer and drink a full glass of water every hour while you work.
  • Try a water-drinking app like Daily Water Free or Daily Water, which can help you set daily water goals by sending you reminders to drink.
  • Try a water challenge. Consider our 14-day lemon water challenge here.
A glass of lemon water.
Photo of author
Amber Sayer is a Fitness, Nutrition, and Wellness Writer and Editor, as well as a NASM-Certified Nutrition Coach and UESCA-certified running, endurance nutrition, and triathlon coach. She holds two Masters Degrees—one in Exercise Science and one in Prosthetics and Orthotics. As a Certified Personal Trainer and running coach for 12 years, Amber enjoys staying active and helping others do so as well. In her free time, she likes running, cycling, cooking, and tackling any type of puzzle.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.