10 Week 10k Training Plan + Complete Training Guide

Training for a 10k in ten weeks is possible for beginners but, at the same time, extremely challenging.

Most 10k training plans for beginners are at least several months or more, particularly if you have not run a 5k before and are taking more of a couch to 10k approach.

With that said, it should still be possible to finish a 10k following a 10 week 10k training plan, particularly if you have been doing a little bit of running already or you’re open to the idea that you may need to do some amount of planned or unplanned walking during the race.

In this article, we have put together a 10 week 10k training plan and guide for beginners to help you dive off the deep end on your running journey and tackle the mighty 10k.

We will cover: 

  • How Far Is 10k?
  • Can You Train for 10k in 10 Weeks?
  • 10 Week 10k Training Plan for Beginners

Ready to get training? Let’s jump in!

People running a 10k.

How Far Is 10k?

In case you’ve signed up to run a 10k, but aren’t even entirely sure what the race entails, let’s get you up to speed so you can prepare your mind and body for what’s to come. 

The “k” component of the 10k distance stands for the metric distance of a kilometer, so a 10k is 10,000 meters. 

Because there are about 1,609 meters per mile, a 10k race converts to approximately 6.2 miles.

Can You Train for 10k in 10 Weeks?

In most cases, it’s possible to train for 10k in 10 weeks as long as you are in good health and have the time and energy to run 3-4 days per week, but it’s certainly a more aggressive ramp-up to the 6.2-mile distance than most new runners typically follow.

Ultimately, training to run your first 10k in just ten weeks is quite ambitious if you have not been doing any running or other types of cardio workouts.

Therefore, there is a potentially higher risk of injury by progressing too quickly, and you might find that it’s quite difficult to keep up with the rapid rate of increasingly longer workouts, particularly if you haven’t been doing any type of exercise.

A person running on a path in a race.

Here are a few tips to reduce your risk of injury and cross that finish line strong and healthy:

#1: Listen To Your Body

It’s very important that you listen to your body and take extra rest days or swap cross-training workouts as necessary.

#2: Strength Train

It’s also a good idea to try to supplement the provided 10 week 10k training plan for beginners with strength training and core workouts two to three times per week.

These benefits of strength training can help support your running and reduce the risk of injuries and can keep your joints healthy.

Lift heavy weights, aiming to use a load that you can only lift for 8 to 12 repetitions at most. Use good form and complete 3 sets of each exercise. 

Core exercises like planks, reverse crunches, bicycle crunches, V-ups, supermans, and bird dogs are really helpful to incorporate regularly into your training routine. 

A person doing a glute bridge.

#3: Add Mobility

Hip mobility and strengthening exercises, such as glute bridges, leg lifts, clam shells, and fire hydrants, are also key components of a good running prehab (injury prevention) protocol.

Spending just 5-10 minutes three or four times per week doing core and hip exercises will go a long way towards keeping your body strong and healthy. 

#4: Hydrate

Staying well hydrated before, during, and after your workouts is important for not only your performance but also your overall health and recovery from your workouts.

Most of the running workouts on this 10 week 10k training plan for beginners will take an hour or less, so drinking plain water instead of sports drinks is typically sufficient

However, if you sweat a lot or if you have difficulty eating enough carbohydrates before you run (for example, if you have a sensitive stomach for a run first thing in the morning), having a sports drink, or at least an electrolyte beverage with a little bit of glucose, can be helpful.

A person drinking a bottle of water.

10 Week 10k Training Plan for Beginners

We have created this beginner’s 10 week 10k training plan for new runners who are just getting started on their running journey or who are coming back to the sport after some time off.

You don’t have to currently be doing any running, so it can be considered a Couch to 10k training plan. With that said, it usually takes most new runners at least 3-4 months to build up the cardiovascular endurance and strength to run at 10k without stopping.

Training to run your first 10k in just 10 weeks is quite ambitious if you have not been doing any running or other types of cardio workouts.

Download The Training Plan Here

Enter your email, and I’ll send you this free training plan now, in PDF and Google Sheets formats (completely customizable), in both miles and kilometers.  

Previous visitor or not seeing where to sign up?

Head over to our 10k training plan database for full access to all plans.

download this free training plan in pdf or google sheet
MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday
Warm up: Brisk walk for 5 min; Workout: 10 x 30 seconds run/1 min walk;
Cool down: 5 min walk
Cross training: 20 minutesRestWarm up:
Brisk walk for 5 min;
Workout: 10 x 1 minute run/1 min walk;
Cool down: 5 min walk
Cross training: 20 minutesWarm up: Brisk walk for 5 min; Workout: 10 x 90 seconds run/1 min walk;
Cool down: 5 min walk
Rest
Warm up: Brisk walk for 5 min; Workout: 8 x 2 minute run/1 min walk;
Cool down: 5 min walk
Cross training: 20-30 minutesRestWarm up: Brisk walk for 5 min; Workout: 8 x 2:30  run/1 min walk;
Cool down: 5 min walk
Cross training: 20 minutesWarm up: Brisk walk for 5 min; Workout: 8 x 3 minute run/1 min walk; Cool down: 5 min walkRest
Warm up: Brisk walk for 5 min; Workout: 6 x 4 min run/1 min walk; Cool down: 5 min walkCross training: 35 minutesRestWarm up:
Brisk walk for 5 min; Workout: 5 x 5 minute run/1 min walk; Cool down: 5 min walk
Cross training: 30 minutesWarm up: Brisk walk for 5 min; Workout: 2 x 10 minute run/30 seconds walk; Cool down: 5 min walkRest
Warm up: Brisk walk for 5 min; Workout: Run 16 minutes without stopping; Cool down: 5 min walkCross training: 40 minutesRestWarm up:
Brisk walk for 5 min;
Workout: Run 2 miles (3k) without stopping;
Cool down: 5 min walk
Easy run 15 minutes or cross training 30 minutesWarm up: Brisk walk for 5 min; Workout: Run 2.5 miles (4k) without stoppingRest
Warm up: Brisk walk for 5 min; Workout: Run 3 miles (5 km)Cross training: 45 minutesRestWarm up:
Brisk walk for 5 min;
Workout: Run 2 miles (3k), running the first half mile of each mile hard and running the second half mile of each mile easy
Easy run 15 minutes or cross training 30 minutesWarm up: Brisk walk for 5 min; Workout: Run 3 miles (5 km)Rest
Run 3.5 miles at an easy pace (5.5 km)Cross training: 45 minutesRestWarm up: Brisk walk for 5 min; Workout: Run 3 miles (5km) with 10 x 1 min hard running interspersed during the workoutEasy run 20 minutes or cross training 30 minutesRun 3.5 miles (5.5 km)Rest
Run 4 miles at an easy pace (6.5 km)Cross training: 50 minutesRestWarm up: Brisk walk for 5 min; Workout: Run 3 miles (5 km) with 10 x 1 min hard running interspersed during the workoutEasy run 20 minutes or cross training 30 minutesRun 4 miles (6.5 km)Rest
Run 4.5 miles at an easy pace (7 km)Cross training: 50 minutesRestWarm up: Brisk walk for 5 min; Workout: Run 4 miles (6.5 km) with 6 x 2 min hard running interspersed during the workoutEasy run 20 minutes or cross training 30 minutesRun 5 miles (8 km)Rest
Run 5.5 miles at an easy pace (9 km)Cross training: 60 minutesRestRun 6 miles at an easy pace (9.5 km)Easy run 20 minutes or cross training 30 minutesWarm up: Brisk walk for 5 min; Workout: Run 4 miles (6.5 km) with 4 x 3 min hard running interspersed during the workoutRest
Run 4 miles at an easy pace (6.5 km)Cross training: 40-45 minutesEasy run: 3-4 miles (6-7 km)RestEasy jog: 15-20 minutes and 4 x 75m strides10k Race!Rest

Taking on this 10week 10k training plan for beginners certainly won’t be easy, but if you make the commitment to yourself and work hard, you should be able to get across the finish line of your first 10k in just ten weeks.

Enjoy the journey and welcome to the wonderful running community. We are thrilled to have you!

For more of our 10k resources, chec out our full database here.

People running through a finish line at a 10k race.
Photo of author
Amber Sayer is a Fitness, Nutrition, and Wellness Writer and Editor, and contributes to several fitness, health, and running websites and publications. She holds two Masters Degrees—one in Exercise Science and one in Prosthetics and Orthotics. As a Certified Personal Trainer and running coach for 12 years, Amber enjoys staying active and helping others do so as well. In her free time, she likes running, cycling, cooking, and tackling any type of puzzle.

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