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How To Run 10k In 35 Minutes: Complete Guide + Training Plan

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Let’s get one thing straight: If you are looking into how to run 10k in 35 minutes, you’re going to be taking on a challenging goal and accomplishing something very few runners can achieve.

After all, Running Level reports that the average 10k time across all ages and genders is 49:43, which is quite a bit slower. However, the 10k world records for men and women are both much faster than 35 minutes, so it’s definitely possible to run 10k in 35 minutes if you put in the work.

In this guide, we will cover how to run 10k in 35 minutes and provide a complete training plan to run a 10k in 35 minutes.

We will look at: 

  • How Far Is 10k?
  • 10k In 35 Minutes Pace
  • 10k in 35 Minutes Running Speed
  • How to Run 10k in 35 Minutes
  • Elements of Training to Run 10k in 35 Minutes
  • 10k In 35 Minutes Training Plan

Let’s get started!

People running a 10k.

How Far Is 10k?

If you’re looking into how to run 10k in 35 minutes, there’s a good chance you’re very well acquainted with this race distance, but just in case you’re a sudden phenom with little running experience, let’s review the basics.

The “k” component of the 10k distance stands for the metric distance of a kilometer, so a 10k is 10,000 meters. For runners in the United States who are more accustomed to miles, this converts to 6.214 miles.

For simplicity, most people shorten the 6.214 miles to 6.2 miles when they discuss 10k, but the distance of any official 10k event will be the full 10 kilometers, or 6.214 miles.

10k In 35 Minutes Pace

To run 10k in 35 minutes, you will need to run 5:38 per mile or 3:30 per kilometer. This means a 35-minute 10k pace is 5:38 per mile (5 minutes and 35 seconds) or 3:30 per kilometer (3 minutes and 30 seconds).

However, since most people looking to run 10k in 35 minutes want to break 35 minutes as a barrier (running 34:59 or faster), aim to run the race at a pace of 5:37 per mile or just under 3:30 per kilometer. This will give you a tiny buffer to come in under 35 minutes.

If you are running on a track, 10k in 35 minutes works out to roughly 84 seconds or 1:24 per 400 meters and 2:48 for 800 meters.

People running hard on a track.

10k In 35 Minutes Running Speed

If you are training to run 10k in 35 minutes on the treadmill, your race pace workouts will be run at a treadmill speed of approximately 10.6 mph (17.1 km/hr).

How to Run 10k in 35 Minutes

Running 10k in 35 minutes is a super impressive feat. According to Run Repeat, running 10k in 35 minutes places a male in the top 0.7% of all finishers (faster than 99.3% of all finishers) and places a female in the top 0.2% of all females (faster than 99.8% of all females).

This is not to say that if you’re indeed an elite runner you can’t run 10k in 35 minutes. Running 10k in 35 minutes is an appropriate goal if you’ve run a 10k around 37 minutes or faster. If you have yet to run fairly close to this time, you might want to start with running a 10k under 40 minutes.

If this is your first 10k, you should be able to run 5k in 17 minutes.

A person running hard on a track.

You should also be able to run 2 miles in 11 minutes (or at least 2 kilometer in 7 minutes, though preferably 3-5 at that pace), as this will be your race pace for 10k in 35 minutes.

Once you take care of the basics in terms of training and are following an appropriate 10K training plan, an additional edge you can get for further improvements can come down to lifestyle choices—the things you’re doing when you’re not running.

For example, you should eat a nutritious diet with minimally processed foods and a wide range of healthy natural foods, get at least 7 to 8 hours of quality sleep every night, drink plenty of water, limit alcohol and soda, and minimize stress

Work on figuring out the timing of your running and eating so that you feel energized and fueled without being bloated and full. Focus on carbohydrates before you run and a balance of protein and carbohydrates to refuel afterwards.

See yourself as a runner not just someone who runs. When you do all the little things, they can add up and help you hit a 10k PR.

A person running at the top of a hill.

Elements of Training to Run 10k in 35 Minutes

Our 35-minute 10k training plan involves running 4-5 days per week, and resting at least one. You should be able to run 6-7 miles comfortably without stopping and have about 6-12 hours per week to train.

To run 10k in 35 minutes, you need to follow a well-rounded training program with long runs to build your endurance, base-building aerobic runs, interval workouts, hills, threshold intervals, tempo runs, cross-training, and strength training

Since you’re likely an advanced runner if you’re trying to run 10k in 35 minutes, we probably don’t need to cover all of these basic training elements, but we will review a few of the more advanced types of training:

Speed Workouts

Speed workouts on the track will involve race pace intervals (1:24/400 meters for the goal of running 10k in 35 minutes) and intervals run slightly faster than race pace.

These interval workouts get your body used to running fast and build comfort and tolerance to race pace.

A person running on the road.

Threshold Workouts

Threshold workouts are designed to increase your lactate threshold, or the point at which your body is no longer able to clear lactate from the muscles as quickly as it is being produced. Beyond this point, you will rapidly fatigue and your legs feel heavy and tired.

The lactate threshold occurs around 83-88% of your VO2 max, so your threshold run pace would be the pace you are running at 83-88% of your VO2 max according to your lab results or roughly the pace you could hold at max effort for an hour of running. 

For most runners, the threshold run pace is about 15-20 seconds per mile slower than 10k race pace. Therefore, if you are training to run 10K in 35 minutes, your threshold workouts should be run around 5:53:-5:58 pace per mile or about 3:38-3:43 per kilometer.

Critical Velocity Training

Critical Velocity training, CV training for short, is a training method created by Tom Schwartz that involves running at a “somewhat hard” pace you can sustain for half an hour.

Therefore, critical velocity training involves any running workout done at a pace that you could hold running at maximal effort for 30 minutes. 

A person running hard on the sidewalk.

In this way, CV training can be equated to how threshold training involves any workout where threshold pace is used, keeping in mind that threshold pace is one that can be sustained all out for an hour of running.

If you run 10k in 35 minutes, your critical velocity pace is slightly faster than 10k race pace, so it’s faster than threshold pace. CV running can be equated to an effort level around 90 percent of your VO2 max. 

CV training can increase the aerobic capacity of Type IIa muscle fibers. These adaptations will help you sustain harder efforts for longer distances without producing the fatiguing byproducts of glycolysis and anaerobic metabolism, meaning that you can sustain a faster “hard cruising speed.”

Strides

Strides are usually anywhere from 50-200 meters or so, and should be run at near-maximal speeds. Running strides conditions your neuromuscular system to handle faster paces in a controlled and coordinated manner. Strides increase your cadence, or turnover, which can help you run faster.

If you want to run faster, you can increase your stride length, stride frequency, or both. However, research indicates that increasing your cadence can reduce your risk of injury, whereas increasing your stride length can increase your chance of injury.

People running sprints on a track.

When you run with a faster cadence and a shorter stride length, your feet are always closer under your center of mass—not too far in front of your pelvis, which increases the force on your joints because it lengthens the moment arm through the joint.

Cross-Training Workouts

Cross-training is an effective way to still get an aerobic workout while using different muscles and reducing the impact of your activity relative to running. Low-impact exercises like cycling, pool running, swimming, elliptical, and rowing can supplement your running and help prevent overuse injuries.

Strength Training

It is important to include core work, mobility exercises, and strength training workouts 2-3 times per week.

Total-body strength training workouts help prevent injuries by correcting strength imbalances and building functional stability so that your body can handle the miles of running. 

People doing squats at the gym.

10k In 35 Minutes Training Plan

This 6-week 10k training plan will help you break 35 minutes in the 10k. In addition to the workouts listed on your training plan below, try to add 2-3 days of strength training per week.

MondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday
Rest or 30-45 minutes cross-trainingWarm up 1 mile or 2 km

4 x 800 meters in 2:48 with 200 meter jog in between

8-10 x 400 meters in 1:24 with 200 meter jog in between

Cool down 1 mile or 2 km
4 miles (7 km) easy run or 30 minutesRest dayWarm up 2 miles 

10-12 x 100 meter or 30-45 second hill sprints

1 mile cool down
4 miles (7 km) easy runLong run 6 miles or 9 km
Rest or 30-45 minutes cross-trainingWarm up 1 mile or 2 km

8-10 x 1,000 meters in 3:28-3:30 with 200 meter jog in between

Cool down 1 mile or 2k
4 miles (7 km) easy run or 30 minutesRest dayWarm up 1 mile or 2 km

2 x 15 minutes at 5:51-5:56 pace per mile or 3:39-3:44 per km with 90 seconds in between

4 x 30 seconds at sprint/mile pace with 30 seconds rest

Cool down 1 mile or 2 km
4-5 miles easy run or 7-8 kmLong run 6 miles or 10 km
Rest or 30-45 minutes cross-trainingWarm up 1 mile or 2 km

6 x 1 mile in 5:33-5:38 with 200 meter jog in between

Cool down 1 mile or 2 km
4 miles (7 km) easy run or 30 minutesRest dayWarm up 1 mile or 2 km

2 x 20 minutes at 5:50-5:55 pace per mile or 3:38-3:43 per km
90 seconds in between

4 x 30 seconds at sprint/mile pace with 30 seconds rest

Cool down 1 mile or 2 km
4 miles (7 km) easy runLong run 7 miles or 11 km
Rest or 30-60 minutes cross-trainingWarm up 1 mile or 2 km

2 x 2 miles in 11:10-11:16
200 meter jog 

1 x mile in 5:33-5:37

4 x 400 meters in 1:20-1:23 with 90 seconds recovery

Cool down 1 mile or 2 km
4-5 miles (7-8 km) easy runRest dayWarm up 1 mile or 2 km

5-6 x 5 minute at critical velocity training pace with 90 seconds jog recovery in between each and then 6 x 30 seconds at mile pace.

8 minute jog cool down
4-5 miles easy run (7-8 km) 4 x 50-75m stridesLong run 8 miles or 13 km
Rest or 45-60 minutes cross-trainingWarm up 1 mile or 2 km

1 x 2 miles in 11:10-11:15 
200 meter jog 

5 x 1,000 meters in 3:25-3:29 with 60 seconds recovery

Cool down 1 mile or 2 km
5-6 miles (8-9 km) easy runRest dayWarm up 1 mile or 2 km

40 minutes at threshold pace (5:52-5:57 min/mile or 3:38-3:42 min/km)

Cool down 1 mile or 2 km
4-5 miles easy run or 30 minutes
4 x 50-75m strides
Long run 6 miles or 10 km
Rest or 45 minutes cross-trainingWarm up 1 mile or 2 km

10 x 1,000 meters in 3:28-3:30 with 200 meter jog in between

4 x 200 meters at mile pace with full recovery

Cool down 1 mile or 2 km
4-5 mile easy run or 30 minutesRest day20 minute easy jog + 4 strides10k RaceShake out or active recovery walk

After you crush the 35-minute barrier, maybe you’ll want to tackle a half marathon!

A close up of people's legs, running.
Photo of author
Amber Sayer is a Fitness, Nutrition, and Wellness Writer and Editor, as well as a NASM-Certified Nutrition Coach and UESCA-certified running, endurance nutrition, and triathlon coach. She holds two Masters Degrees—one in Exercise Science and one in Prosthetics and Orthotics. As a Certified Personal Trainer and running coach for 12 years, Amber enjoys staying active and helping others do so as well. In her free time, she likes running, cycling, cooking, and tackling any type of puzzle.

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