New Balance Vs Asics Running Shoe Comparison

Choosing which running shoes to use can be a bit overwhelming with all of the options out there.

New Balance and ASICS are among two of the most popular running shoe companies for runners of all ability levels. But, what are the major differences between New Balance vs ASICS running shoes?

In this article, we will provide a comparison of New Balance vs ASICS running shoes to help you decide which brand is the better fit for you.

We will cover:

The Main Differences Between New Balance vs ASICS Running Shoes

Let’s dive in! 

A person running in foggy weather.

The Main Differences Between New Balance vs ASICS Running Shoes

Although both New Balance and ASICS offer similar types of models of running shoes, there are some notable differences between the two.

There isn’t necessarily a “better” brand between New Balance vs ASICS running shoes; rather, you can get a premium or economical pair of running shoes from either brand, or any arch structure, pronation control needs, level of cushioning, and training style.

In general, New Balance running shoes are favored by runners who need a wider shoe, particularly for runners who are seeking wide and extra-wide widths. 

There are also some excellent New Balance stability and motion control running shoes for runners who need more control for overpronation.

In addition to running shoes, New Balance makes sneakers and athletic footwear for a variety of cross-training, walking, and other activities, as well as athleisure footwear. Many of the New Balance shoes are made in the United States, which is a characteristic that many American runners appreciate.

ASICS running shoes are most known for the GEL technology, which provides shock absorption via a plasma-like material.

The running shoes are fairly narrow, particularly through the midfoot and heel. In addition to running shoes, ASICS makes other athletic shoes and shoes at a variety of price points for those on a budget.

A person wearing casual blue, red and white New Balance shoes.

New Balance vs ASICS Running Shoes: Fit 

The biggest difference between New Balance vs ASICS running shoes is in the fit of the shoes. New Balance running shoes are notorious for running somewhat wide, even for the standard width. 

The midfoot is somewhat roomier, and the toe box is nice and wide to permit natural foot splay. If you have a wide forefoot, a bunion, metatarsalgia, or Morton’s neuroma, you will likely much prefer the fit and feel of New Balance vs ASICS running shoes.

More so than pretty much any other popular running shoe brand, and certainly compared to ASICS, New Balance also offers far more models of their shoes in wide and even extra wide widths besides just the standard width. 

This is a fantastic benefit of New Balance vs ASICS for runners with wide feet. There are also New Balance shoes in extra narrow (2A) for runners with especially narrow feet.

On the other hand, ASICS running shoes are notorious for falling on the narrow side. They fit the average foot quite snuggly through the heel and midfoot with a tight heel lock.

The toe box region is also more narrow, particularly compared with New Balance running shoes. If you have a narrow foot, you will be better suited with a fit of ASICS vs New Balance running shoes.

A pair of teal, pink and white Asics.

New Balance vs ASICS Running Shoes: Durability

The durability of running shoes refers to how well they stand up over time through use or how many miles you can get out of them before you need to replace them. More durable shoes will have a longer life expectancy.

Both New Balance and ASICS make running shoes that span the gamut in terms of price point. Entry-level running shoes are more affordable but may not last as long due to the materials used and the construction. 

Premium running shoes will last longer because the foams, gels, and rubber material in the midsole and outsole can rebound time after time for a longer period.

The durability of any pair of running shoes will depend not only on the characteristics and qualities of the shoes themselves but also on factors pertinent to your own personal body and training, such as your weight, running gait, and whether you rotate your shoes.

In terms of the shoes themselves, although there’s a range of lifespan across the models of New Balance and ASICS running shoes, the average durability is somewhat higher for ASICS vs New Balance running shoes.

Like most running shoe brands, New Balance running shoes are said to last about 300-500 miles. ASICS reports a slightly higher life expectancy of 450 to 500 miles.

A person jumping in New Balance shoes.

New Balance vs ASICS Running Shoes: Breathability

Both New Balance and ASICS running shoes are highly breathable to keep your feet cool as you run.

New Balance uses a Hypoknit upper. This is a mesh blend that provides moisture-wicking and breathability.

ASICS uses a mesh upper and an Ortholite material under your foot, which not only provide some additional cushioning but is designed to be breathable to prevent your feet from sweating and to help wick moisture away.

Note that the Gore-Tex running shoe models will not be breathable; having the waterproof Gore-Tex comes at the sacrifice of breathability.

New Balance vs ASICS Running Shoes: Cushioning

Another major difference between New Balance vs ASICS running shoes is in the type and feel of the cushioning materials used in the shoes. 

A group pf people running on the road.

Both companies offer running shoes with various levels of cushioning, from fairly minimalist running shoes to maximalist running shoes with thick midsoles and a high stack height.

Depending on the particular type of running shoe, New Balance uses Fresh Foam and FuelCell foam. 

FuelCell is a nitrogen-infused foam that is designed to be extra soft yet responsive and extremely lightweight. 

ASICS uses Flytefoam technology for cushioning as well as proprietary GEL. This type of cushioning is durable, and the GEL provides excellent shock absorption with a plasma-like consistency.

The Flytefoam is very lightweight and responsive, yet somewhat less responsive than the New Balance FuelCell.

Although not necessarily true across the board when considering every model of both brands, if you want maximal cushioning, it is typically better to go with ASICS vs New Balance running shoes, and if you want lightweight, responsive shoes with more energy return yet some cushioning, it is better to go with New Balance vs ASICS.

A blurred photo of pink running shoes.

New Balance vs ASICS Running Shoes: Stability

Both New Balance and ASICS offer running shoes with different levels of stability and motion control provided for runners who overpronate.

New Balance stability running shoes utilize a bigger platform, much like Hoka running shoes. By widening the base of support, the shoes provide more stability upon landing and push-off.

Then they have an S Curve to provide lateral stability to control side-to-side motion and a more significant heel flare that helps prevent your foot from rolling inward excessively when you land (especially if you are a heel striker).

ASICS stability shoes provide increased stability and pronation control through a variety of added support structures.

There is a resin Trusstic system along the length of the outsole. This helps prevent twisting or torsion of the shoe to enhance stability.

Additionally, ASICS provides stability via an external heel clutch, which helps control pronation at landing. There is also a Duomax midsole, which is a dual-density material that provides arch support and lateral stability. 

This material also helps prevent inward collapsing of the foot upon ground contact.

Pink and white Asics.

New Balance vs ASICS Running Shoes: Price

One of the benefits of both New Balance and ASICS running shoes compared with certain brands such as Hoka and Altra is that New Balance and ASICS offer a range of prices, including budget-friendly entry-level running shoes and premium running shoes.

In general, both companies offer competitive prices for high-quality running shoes, but if you are looking to save money, you might be able to find slightly cheaper running shoes by going with New Balance vs ASICS.

The prices for premium New Balance running shoes typically range between $80-$100, while ASICS shoes are closer to $110 to $160.

With that said, you can find previous models and entry-level running shoes for either brand on Amazon or other third-party sites that are usually significantly cheaper.

Overall, both New Balance and ASICS offer excellent running shoes for runners of different levels, training goals, and support needs. 

If you have a wider foot or are seeking particularly wide-width running shoes, it is better to go with New Balance vs ASICS, and if you want a narrower fit and more cushioning, you will likely find a better match with ASICS vs New Balance running shoes.

A person taking a step in running shoes.

Here are a few ASICS running shoes to check out:

ASICS Men’s Gel-Venture 8

ASICS Women’s Gel-Venture 8 Running Shoes

ASICS Women’s Gel-Nimbus 24 Running Shoes

ASICS Women’s Gel-Venture 6 Running Shoe

ASICS Men’s Gel-Kayano 29 Running Shoes

ASICS Men’s Gel-Cumulus 23 Running Shoes

ASICS Men’s Gel-Nimbus 24 Running Shoes

A brown New Balance shoe.

Here are a few New Balance running shoes to check out:

New Balance Women’s Fresh Foam X 1080 V12 Running Shoe

New Balance Men’s Fresh Foam X 1080 V12 Running Shoe

New Balance Women’s Fresh Foam X 860 V12 Running Shoe

New Balance Men’s 680v6

New Balance Women’s Fresh Foam 680 V7 Running Shoe

A person wearing pink, teal, and black ASCIS.
Photo of author
Amber Sayer is a Fitness, Nutrition, and Wellness Writer and Editor, as well as a NASM-Certified Nutrition Coach and UESCA-certified running, endurance nutrition, and triathlon coach. She holds two Masters Degrees—one in Exercise Science and one in Prosthetics and Orthotics. As a Certified Personal Trainer and running coach for 12 years, Amber enjoys staying active and helping others do so as well. In her free time, she likes running, cycling, cooking, and tackling any type of puzzle.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.